Pregnancy Vitamins May Trigger Asthma in Kids

Vitamins and supplements that mothers take during pregnancy could predispose children (and even grandchildren) to asthma, reports NewScientist.

A study at Duke University Medical Center showed that mice fed vitamins similar to human pregnancy supplements had offspring with signs of asthma. The supplements turned down the expression of certain genes, and the lungs of offspring had high levels of immune cells and proteins that predict asthma; furthermore, this effect was passed down through generations in a process known as epigenetics. Continue reading…

Simple Lifestyle Changes to Avoid Toxins

Nurse Diane Waddell has been studying environmental health and holistic care for 30 years, and she recently told St. Joseph News that simple lifestyle changes can lead to great gains in overall health.

Toxins are everywhere in our modern world – in the air, water, food, and even in cleaning products that claim to clean up toxins. Waddell offers the following tips to avoid toxins: Continue reading…

Tylenol Use Linked to Child Asthma

If your baby or toddler has a low-grade fever, you should resist the parental urge to reach for a Tylenol bottle. Young children who are given Tylenol (also known as paracetamol or acetaminophen) have a 50 percent increased risk of developing allergic disease, according to The West Australian.

Children who take Tylenol frequently have triple the risk of developing asthma and nasal allergies and double the risk of developing eczema. Continue reading…

Federal Agencies Hold First Healthy Homes Summit

Last week four federal agencies held their first Healthy Homes Summit in Baltimore. The goal of the summit was to promote the building of healthy homes free of lead, chemicals, mold, moisture, and pests.

“Health doesn’t happen in the hospital. It happens at home,” says Julie Gerberding, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. “Our goal isn’t to be Big Brother, but people are asking for advice and information.” Continue reading…

Antibacterial Soap with Triclosan – Healthy or Unhealthy?

I had an eye exam a few days ago and noticed antibacterial soap in the optometrist’s office. It seems like everyone is buying antibacterial soap these days. As more people become concerned about health, antibacterial soaps (and other antibacterial products) are becoming more popular. But is antibacterial soap necessary? And could it actually do more harm than good?

Most antibacterial soaps contain triclosan, a synthetic chemical that’s classified as a pesticide. Introduced to consumer products in 1995, triclosan can remain on the skin for hours, even after you rinse your hands, and it has been linked to liver damage. Continue reading…