Sylvane.com » Indoor Health Matters


Dehumidifiers Help Museums Preserve Collections

Posted by Ivey on January 29th, 2010

Interior of the Louvre MuseumMaintaining an optimal climate in museum collections can be extremely tricky. Everything from the general climate of the region to types of items in the collection to the comfort of museum visitors and employees must be taken into account. Relative humidity is one key consideration.

According to an article by the Northern States Conservation Center that addresses temperature and relative humidity levels for museum objects, “there is no single relative humidity range that is ideal for all museum objects.” However, NSCC does recommend maintaining a non-fluctuating relative humidity (RH) above 25% and below 65% for mixed collections — noting that many museums maintain an RH of 45%.

Keeping a consistent relative humidity is crucial, as an RH below 25% “can cause embrittlement of hygroscopic materials such as leather and paper,” and an RH above 25% can lead to mold growth and metal corrosion.
Read more about controlling humidity in museums

Air Purifiers Combat Candle Soot

Posted by Ivey on January 22nd, 2010

Soot produced by burning a candle Once used primarily as sources of light, candles are a staple in most of today’s homes. They can be used to create ambiance in a room, to add fragrance, and to add soft lighting to a space. However, did you know that these symbols of serenity could actually be damaging your indoor air?

The National Candle Association reports that U.S. retail sales of candles are estimated at approximately $2 billion annually. With candle sales and usage growing, it’s no wonder that consumers and indoor air quality experts have started studying the effects of burning candles.
Read more about the impact of candle-burning