Sylvane.com » Indoor Health Matters


June Air Quality Evangelists

Posted by Allison on June 29th, 2012

Air Quality EvangelistsLet’s face it: we don’t always have all the answers. Here at Sylvane, we know a lot about appliances that treat indoor environments.  We can tell you which dehumidifier or air purifier would work best for your space. But when it comes to the wide world of air quality, we often have to do our own research to stay on top of things.

Where do we look for information? Air Quality Evangelists.

Air Quality Evangelists are bloggers, writers and website owners who demonstrate a passion for clean, healthy air. Their sites contain reliable information about air quality – from personal accounts of living with chemical sensitivities to medical opinions about air treatment appliances. Each month, we feature a few of these Air Quality Evangelists on our blog.

We added a few more to the list!

See this month's Air Quality Evangelists!

Improving Air Quality in Your Kitchen: Do’s and Don’ts

Posted by Allison on June 22nd, 2012

Improving the Air Quality In Your KitchenYour kitchen is where you prepare your child’s favorite meals. It’s where you share your secret family recipes with your new spouse. It’s also one of the dirtiest rooms in your home.

According to a new study, kitchens can contain air that is three times more polluted than what you breathe on a busy city street.

What can you do to improve the indoor air quality in your kitchen? Here is a list of do’s and don’ts.

Do:

Turn on ventilation fans while cooking.

cookingCooking generates a lot of heat, steam, and odors that need to be ventilated. Ventilation fans help suck in cooking fumes, which can be dangerous at high concentrations. It is easier for these fans to ventilate the air while you’re cooking, versus after the gases disperse throughout your kitchen.

Ventilation fans can also help relieve your air conditioner. A typical home stove generates 7,000 BTUs of heat per burner, on average. That’s 28,000 BTUs when four burners are in use. Most residential room air conditioners have cooling capacities that range from about 6,000 BTUs to 12,000 BTUs per hour. So when you’re cooking an elaborate dinner, your AC is working just as hard as you are!

Read more tips for improving the air quality in your kitchen.

20% Off Fans and Air Conditioners Sale Kicks Off Summer Fun!

Posted by Tony on June 20th, 2012

It may feel like it’s been summer for a while now (it certainly has here in Atlanta), but summer didn’t officially start until today. To celebrate the season, we’re offering a 20% off Cooling Sale! Several popular brands of air conditioners, fans, and evaporative coolers are on sale, so you can enjoy summer instead of sweating through it.

Here are a few products you’ll find 20% off at Sylvane.com through Sunday, July 8, 2012:

Keep Reading About Our 20% Off Cooling Sale

Port-A-Cool Swamp Coolers Keep Our Military Cool

Posted by Ashley on June 15th, 2012

Very hot. An intense dry heat. Like an oven. Imagine holding your face in the heat of the oven until you absolutely have to turn away. That’s what it was like over there.

This is how my husband described the heat in the summer of 2007 in Baghdad when I asked him to recount it for me a few days ago. I still haven’t tried the oven test yet, but I get the point. Not fun!

During his deployment, I had to stop myself from complaining about the Georgia heat. It was nothing compared to Iraq where temps were regularly 110 or higher. In one of his care packages, I included everything I could think of to help him stay cool—a personal fan he could wear around his neck, a cooling bandana, a beach towel for the pool (yes, there was a pool!), even squirt guns to bum around with during his downtime. If I could’ve shipped him a swamp cooler without customs eyeing me suspiciously, I would have.

Port-A-Cool swamp coolersI didn’t know at the time, but our troops in the Middle East already keep cool using evaporative coolers.  In fact, Texas-based Port-A-Cool, a leading manufacturer of residential- and industrial-grade evaporative coolers, has provided these solutions to our military for over 20 years.

Read more about Port-A-Cool swamp coolers and their military applications

Get Your Air Conditioner Ready for Summer

Posted by Allison on June 8th, 2012

Get Your Air Conditioner Ready for SummerIs there anything worse than a broken air conditioner on a hot summer day? Frozen yogurt and swimming pools will cool you down for a while. But when you walk through your door after a day of fun in the sun, there is nothing like that blast of chilly air on your face.

The official start of summer – June 20th – is just weeks away. (Although here in Georgia, it feels like we have been deep in it for months.) Prepare your air conditioner for months of heavy use and sweating bodies using these 4 easy steps.

Change Your AC filters once a month1. Clean or replace the filters.
If your AC filters are dirty, the entire system has to work harder to cool your air. This increases energy consumption and ultimately translates to a higher electricity bill. Also, some of the dirt and dust that a clean filter would catch blows through and settles on the coil. This keeps the coil from absorbing as much heat, restricting the effectiveness of your air conditioner.

Keeping the filter clean can cut energy usage by 5-15%, according to the department of education (DOE).

See 3 more tips for summer-prepping your air conditioner.

The Truth About Chlorinated Pools and Asthma

Posted by Allison on June 1st, 2012

Swimming in Chlorinated PoolSwimming is my favorite form of exercise. To feel so weightless while working every muscle in your body is invigorating to me. I’ve been on swim teams since I was twelve, and as an adult I try to swim three times a week; and almost every pool I have used has been indoors.

Is it a miracle I haven’t developed asthma?

For years, studies have shown that children who spend a lot of time in indoor pools have a higher risk of developing asthma than non-swimmers. This is traditionally attributed to the addition of chlorine to the water.

Actually, the problem with chlorinated pools isn’t the chlorine itself, but the gases produced when it combines with organic chemicals like sweat and saliva.

Learn more about the link between chlorinated pools and lung damage.