Sylvane.com » Indoor Health Matters


Don’t Let Allergies (or Airplane Air Quality) Ruin Your Holiday Travel Plans

Posted by Tony on November 20th, 2012

This is one of the busiest travel weeks of the year, and millions of Americans are flying to visit friends and family. In addition to Thanksgiving, a growing number of people are vacationing over the holiday weekend. Between the close quarters, air quality issues, and peanuts being tossed around, airplanes have long been a concern for people with all types of allergies.

The Issues

People believe air quality on planes is an issue because the air is recirculated and windows can’t be opened for ventilation. Stagnant air only gets worse when air circulators are turned off as passengers board or when planes sit for long periods of time. This reused, dry air can cause problems for passengers.

General illness can easily be spread on planes because of a lack of air circulation and confined space. Airplane toilets, soap dispensers, and tray tables can also harbor infectious germs.

Peanut and other food allergies are a concern since reactions can be as extreme as death (although it’s rare). Allergic reactions to food can be triggered by touch, so the close quarters make airplanes a worry for some travelers. Find Out What Airlines Are Doing, What You Can Do, and What Cites You Should Consider Visiting!

An Expert’s Take On Air Quality and Pollution Risks

Posted by Pam on September 17th, 2012

Smoke Stacks

I’m an environmental consultant that specializes in air quality, so people are always surprised to hear I live in one of the United States’ major centers for oil refining. It’s known as one of the most air quality-challenged regions of our country, and needless to say, I get a lot of questions around town about air quality and the risks associated with where I live.

Here’s what I know:

Exxon Mobil’s largest North American petrochemical complex is in the middle of my town. This is where plastic ingredients and the specialty chemicals for foods and personal products come from. In fact, most of the other big oil and chemical companies are also within a half hour drive.

Find out more about this expert's take on air quality.

Extreme Weather Can Worsen Indoor Air Quality

Posted by Ashley on June 17th, 2011

lightning stormEarlier this week, a string of bad storms blew through metro Atlanta, at one point leaving 100,000 homes—my entire neighborhood included—without power. Shortly after we lost electricity and realized it wasn’t coming back on anytime soon, my husband and I began lighting every candle in the house to help supplement our two lone flashlights that definitely were not making the cut. Remembering the importance of indoor air ventilation and how candle soot can damage your indoor air quality, I cracked open a few windows to help get airflow moving.

This apparently wasn’t enough. Within a half-hour, my eyes began to feel irritated; I could feel my lungs growing tighter; and the humid, stale, un-conditioned air felt clammy and downright unhealthy. Eventually, we had to get outside for some fresh air relief. It was then that it dawned on me—we were experiencing the negative effects that extreme weather can have on your indoor air quality. It was a strange coincidence. After all, I was working on a blog about this very subject.

Read more about how extreme weather can affect indoor air quality

It’s Official: Clean Air Helps Us Live Longer

Posted by Ashley on January 23rd, 2009

Cleaner, pollutant-free air adds almost 5 months to our lives. So say the results of an interesting study published in this week’s New England Journal of Medicine. The study, headed by an epidemiologist at Brigham Young University (BYU), tracked the correlation between particulate pollution levels and life expectancy over 2 decades in 51 U.S. cities. Researchers say it’s the first to illustrate that reducing air pollution can translate into a longer lifespan. How’s that for a reason to make an air purifier a permanent part of your environment? Read more about how cleaner air can help you live longer