Sylvane.com » Indoor Health Matters


28 Tips to Improve Your Indoor Air Quality, Part 2

Posted by Ivey on March 14th, 2011

Ladybug Tekno 2350 Vapor Steam CleanerLast week, I posted the first seven tips from my four-part blog series, “28 Tips to Improve Your Indoor Air”. These indoor air improvement suggestions were initially posted on Twitter and Facebook. Created in observance of National Care About Your Indoor Air Month, these suggestions can help you not only rejuvenate your indoor air but create a healthier overall environment in your home. The second set of tips is listed below. Be sure to check back for the last two installments!
Read more of our indoor air quality tips

28 Tips to Improve Your Indoor Air Quality, Part 1

Posted by Ivey on March 7th, 2011

Blueair 503 Air PurifierIn observance of National Care About Your Indoor Air Month, I posted a new indoor air quality tip each day during the month of February on Twitter and Facebook. The first 7 are listed below—just in case you missed one. Stay tuned for the next three installments to read all of our better air tips!

  1. Change or clean your air filters regularly. One of the keys to keeping your indoor air quality clean and healthy is to change the air filters in your air purifier, window or portable air conditioner, central air system, and other filter-containing devices according to manufacturer guidelines. This will also protect the life of the appliance. Join our Better Air Program to receive free convenient reminders when it is time to replace your air purifier filters.
  2. Use “green” cleaning solutions like steam cleaners. Steam cleaners and similar products are great for removing unwanted dirt, debris, bacteria, and viruses from your indoor environment without the use of harsh chemicals. Since steam cleaners just use ordinary water as the cleaning agent, no chemical residues or noxious odors are left behind.
  3. Line dry clothes outside or use a safe dryer setting. Some clothes can’t be safely dried in a clothes dryer, so many people opt to hang them in the bathroom. Hanging clothes in the bathroom can actually foster unhealthy humidity levels and encourage the growth of mold and mildew. Line drying clothes outside or using the dryer when possible will help you maintain healthy air quality in your bathroom and throughout your entire home.
  4. Read more of our indoor air quality tips

National Care About Your Indoor Air Month

Posted by Ivey on February 4th, 2011

Open Doors Lead to Green SurroundingsAs Americans, we understand that outdoor pollutants not only affect the Earth’s well-being but our personal health as well. That’s why each day many of us recycle, use mass transit, drive hybrid vehicles, and take other green measures to protect the environment. However, most of us consider our homes a haven—never realizing that our indoor air could be even more polluted than the air outside. In fact, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that indoor air can be two to five times (and sometimes 100 times) more polluted than outdoor air! This is further compounded by the fact that Americans spend up to 90% of their time indoors.
Find out what you can do to improve your indoor air