Tips for Running Outside During Allergy Season

Running on grass trail.Spring is finally here, and I’m ready to enjoy the nice weather with a run or bike ride outside. There’s only one problem—or maybe millions of tiny ones—pollen! If you have pollen allergies like I do, I’m sure you know how quickly a workout can be ruined by allergy symptoms like sneezing, itchy eyes, or even shortness of breath.

You can do more than enjoy the view from inside the gym though, so lace up your running shoes and get outside! These tips can help you keep pollen allergy symptoms at bay while exercising outdoors:

  1. Know your triggers. Most runners and cyclists take regular routes. If you notice  your symptoms flaring up at certain points on your route, there may be a large concentration of trees or other plants producing pollens that aggravate your allergies. Take notice of the plants and trees around you, and discuss them with your doctor. An allergy test can also be helpful at determining precise triggers.  You may even consider altering your route. Continue reading…

Air Purifiers Help Allergy-Sufferers Cope with Longer Pollen Seasons


IQAir Healthpro Plus
Last week, I woke up with a stuffy head and puffy eyes. “Surely, pollen season hasn’t already started,” I thought. Wrong. The significant jump in temperature over the last couple of weeks prompted dormant trees to wake up and shake off their pollen, which resulted in a pollen count of 742. According to an Atlanta Journal Constitution article, there were no high pollen days in February 2010 and the highest February pollen count in 2009 was 386. Luckily, I had my trusty air purifier ready to go.

Unfortunately, Atlanta isn’t the only U.S. city facing the early onslaught of pollen. Many towns and cities across the southern and southwestern areas of the U.S. are dealing with medium to high levels of pollen, according to Pollen.com. So what’s going on?
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Survive the 2010 Pollen Season

Girl with AllergiesFlowers are blooming, the sun is shining, the weather is warm, and the air is filled with pollen — lots of pollen. For allergy-sufferers across the country, especially in the southern and northeastern United States, the 2010 pollen season is shaping up to be one of the worst in recent history. Last week, The Weather Channel reported pollen counts as high as 5,733 in Atlanta. A typical high pollen count is around 120.

Experts attribute this onslaught of pollen to an unusually cold winter followed by the late of arrival of spring, and higher than average spring temperatures. As a result, trees, flowers, and other plants are all blooming at once, leaving a thick yellow coat in their wake and causing millions to sneeze, cough, itch, and experience other unpleasant allergy symptoms. With grass and weed allergies right around the corner, will allergy-sufferers get to enjoy any of this beautiful spring and summer weather?
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Traveling With Allergies? There’s an App for That

Allergy and Asthma Mobile Phone AppsSpring break season has officially begun. For many people, this is a time to travel and take a break from work, school, or both. Unfortunately for asthma- and allergy-sufferers, spring break isn’t exactly a break. In fact, traveling with allergies and asthma can prove to be hard work. Luckily, there are multiple mobile phone apps available to make traveling with allergies and asthma a little easier:
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Fend Off Spring Pollen

IQ Air Healthpro Plus Air PurifierSpring pollen is back – and it’s in full force. As reported by CNN, ABC News, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution – and quite possibly, that thick layer of yellow powder on your car – this year’s spring pollen is apparently going to be worse than ever. (Let’s all let out a collective groan.) According to countless reports, we can expect higher than normal pollen counts in many parts of the country.

For instance, if you live in the Northeast, you can expect heavier pollen levels as a result of the area’s high population as well as the large number of pollen-producing plants in the region. The Midwest will also likely see a more severe allergy season, stemming from the late winter flooding and snowstorms, which have made the ground ripe for tree and grass growth. In the Southeast, there are conflicting predictions. While some numbers predict a less severe allergy season, allergists at the Atlanta Allergy and Asthma Clinic, say residents in the region should hunker down for a particularly tough season, based on recent pollen trends and weather patterns. Continue reading…