Sylvane.com » Indoor Health Matters


Are Your Home Improvements Harming Your House?

Posted by Ivey on November 5th, 2010

Home ImprovementsIf you are thinking about starting some home improvement projects, a new study released by HealthyStuff.org and conducted by the Ecology Center of Ann Arbor, Mich. reveals that you might have more to think about than comfort and décor. The study tested 3,300 home improvement products: 1,016 samples of flooring and 2,312 samples of wallpaper. The results are a bit shocking.

Heavy metals and other chemical additives, which include lead, cadmium, flame retardants, tin compounds, and phthalates, were commonly found in residential flooring and wallpaper. In fact, more than half of the flooring samples tested positive for one or more chemical additives. Vinyl flooring was indicated to be the most harmful—containing the highest percentage of detectable lead and being twice as likely to contain hazardous chemicals.
Find out more study findings and some healthy home alternatives

Protect Your Family from Formaldehyde Exposure

Posted by Ivey on June 17th, 2010

Formaldehyde can stem from wood products in your homeA recent article in the CNN series, Toxic America, discussed five hazardous substances that most people unknowingly encounter on a daily basis. Among those substances was formaldehyde, which is particularly harmful to your indoor air quality. A colorless gas with a pungent smell, formaldehyde is a known carcinogen that can cause cancers of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts as well as nausea, skin irritation, watery eyes, and burning sensations in the eyes, nose, and throat.

We are often exposed to formaldehyde as a result of breathing the volatile compounds that are released from products that contain it. Unfortunately, formaldehyde exposure is an ever-present threat in most homes. The toxic substance is commonly found in resins that are used as glue during the manufacturing of pressed wood products, such as particle board, plywood, paneling, and fiberboard. It can also be found in glues and other adhesives, durable-press fabrics like drapes, car exhaust, and cigarette smoke.
Find out ways to reduce your risk of formaldehyde exposure